Interior

Come Alive With Colour

May 27, 2015 |

IT IS THROUGH PLEASANT COLOUR PATTERNS THAT THE AMBIENCE OF A PLACE BECOMES REMARKABLE AND MAKES AN APPROPRIATE IMPRESSION. A WELLPLANNED AND FURNISHED SPACE MAY LEAD TO DISAPPOINTMENT DUE TO A LACK OF SUITABLE COLOUR THEMES


It is often believed that colour planning comes naturally to designers, decorators or space planners. As a result, planning, drawing, drafting, rendering and other technical concerns that include comprehending designing interior spaces are kept in priority. Colour scheme planning, therefore, might come as an afterthought. But it cannot be denied that colour plays a central role in interior design. Yet, the systematic study of colour combination is often ignored. It is only an illusion that many believe that colour theory will gradually evolve while designing any space. The truth is that there must be a proper process involved in this. The colour combination process cannot be limited to trial and error, which might bring obscure results. Specific colour theories that relate to the particular needs and demands of individual interior concepts must be developed.

Every colour lends its own specific set of meanings to a given space. Colours possess characteristics that can relate to our emotions. They are powerful elements that can be cognitive as well

While designing any interior space, the colours of the furniture, draperies, carpet, art works and accessories, and the placementsof all these aspects must involve a certain system of colour combination. Every minor detail, pattern and design must be associated with unique colour schemes.
There are many colour theories that have been developed, ranging from scientific studies to applied systems. Those theories, without any doubt, assist colour planning. However, colour schemes cannot be limited to these few drafted formulas. Colour planning can be approached on more practical basis. Practical methods can be applied to planning colour schemes by transforming schemes to implementation in actual mediums.

It must be implied that while playing with colours, there are no certified rules that bring anticipated results. The rules will only make the colour system rigid. Colour planning can be dealt with with openness to make it less problematic. Colour schemes can be inspired by our daily lives, random objects around us, or maybe the vibrant colours of nature.

Developing a colour scheme

A colour scheme is a fundamental element for any successful interior design work. It is through pleasant colour patterns that the ambience of a place becomes remarkable and makes an appropriate impression. A well-planned and furnished space may lead to disappointment due to a lack of suitable colour themes.

 

Other elements of interior design, such as walls, floors, ceilings, furniture and accessories must all fall under a certain colour scheme. The colour selection for these complete interior elements must be made in such a manner that each element complements the other and provides a sense of completeness. There are many complications regarding colour conceptions. Although developing an ideal colour scheme is tedious, there are many colour systems that have been developed with the aim of making complex colour behaviours simpler. The Munsell Colour System is the most appreciated of colour systems. Other popular systems include the Ostwald System, the CIE System, the Oas System, the KUPPER System, the Colour Aid System, and the Paul Klee System. In spite of so many systems having been developed over the course of time, no single available system can provide an appropriate colour scheme for all desired interior design works. Since each system is different from the other, and each design has its own prerequisites, it is necessary to develop

distinctive systems that best associate the interior design in question. Therefore, it is essential that planning colour schemes be more practical and understandable for each interior.

The colour wheel

Although colour themes can be extracted from many mediums, establishing a unique colour scheme is always a risk. The colour wheel is another tool that simplifi es the perception of colour combinations. The colour wheel is a circular arrangement of various colours that are generated through a combination of primary, secondary and tertiary colours. The primary colours are red, yellow and green. When these colours are placed arranged in a circle, more hues can be developed by mixing these colours. Colours generated by a combination of primary colours are secondary colours. Tertiary colours, on the other hand, can be attained through combinations of primary colours and secondary colours. The colour wheel provides a total of twelve hues of colours that can further demonstrate various colour schemes.

 

Blue and mahogany dominate the colour scheme while white ties these different hues together to make for a clean, cohesive look.

  • Monochromatic Colour Scheme: As the word monochromatic suggests, this colour system involves a scheme developed by one dominant colour. Tints, shades of one single colour can form a monochromatic colour scheme.

  • Complementary Colour Scheme: Complementary colours are pairs of colours that are positioned opposite to one another in the colour wheel.

  • Triad Colour Scheme: Triad colour schemes can be acquired by combination of three colours that are equally separated in the colour wheel.

  • Tetrad Colour Scheme: This type of colour scheme can be generated by using four colours that are placed equally around the colour wheel.

  • Analogous Colour Scheme: This scheme includes a combination of colours that is created by using similar sets of colours placed in the colour wheel. It is similar to monochromatic, but differentiated by the addition of colour from another colour family.

  • The colours are chosen in such a manner that they have a very similar visual appear or are in continuation around the colour wheel.

Colour inspiration from nature and art

A system of colours that can be influential in developing a colour scheme helps decide whether or not a good choice of colours is being made. However, sometimes, existing theories can constrain our imagination and these limitations create bewilderment. To seek the infi nite possibilities of openness in innovative ideas, colours present in the natural world can provide endless inspiration. Various colour schemes can be extracted from nature. Nature provides an endless set of colours that amalgamate with perfection only to offer an unlimited source of inspiration. Colour combinations that exist naturally are the most gratifying source to a colour scheme. The natural not only provide a stimulus, but also inspire countless themes.

Nature provides an endless set of colours that amalgamate with perfection only to offer an unlimited source of inspiration. Colour combinations that exist naturally are often the most gratifying source to a colour scheme. The natural not only provide a stimulus, but also inspire countless themes

 

This interior plan of a semi-open living and dining space shows a play between the green of the living room couch set and flooring, and the light teak of the dining room furniture and flooring.


Pattern as well as colour repeat themselves in these modern living spaces. The softness of the spheres and circles (right) and the use of the colour grey (left) balance the contrast created by the recurrent use of red and white in these rooms.

 

The spectacular colours of flowers and plants, the blue tones of the sky, the greens of plants and leaves, the colour of earth and rocks, reflections in water, fruits, vegetables, birds and animals all appear in such a range of hues. Once these amazing varieties of colour are observed, no new formula is needed to maintain a balance. The natural word provides a sense of harmony in colour. The natural world is, without any doubt, an inspiring source to attain almost perfect colour schemes, textures and patterns. Nature acts as an unlimited source of inspiration for designers and artists.

Similarly, colour themes that are based on artworks created by painters or by other medium of artworks, can be taken as another option for completing colour schemes. The tints and shades or tones of similar colours exhibited in artworks and paintings provide possibilities for developing new schemes of colour. It is not necessary that the required colour schemes be limited only to colour theories or actual wheel charts .However, these planned colour schemes can be decided on by placing these colours in the final interior design works.

There are other alternative ways of making colour samples. To convert the planned samples into vivid forms, more realistic approaches like making maquettes and rendering can be applied. They provide a realistic view of the required space. Although these various methods of representation provide an overall view of the proposed space, the accuracy depends on the initial stage of fi nalizing the colour schemes. When deciding on colour concepts, it must be noted that every colour communicates to lend its own specifi c set of meanings to a given space. Colours possess characteristics that can relate to our emotions. They are powerful elements that can be cognitive as well. Some colours are known to bring tranquillity, while others are associated with intense excitements and passions. Colours not only provide visual pleasure and stimulation, but are functional too. The decision of a colour scheme comes along with its specifi c parameters. The choices of a scheme might lead to a space being dominated by warm colours, cool colours or neutral colours. Accordingly, the factors that influence the decision-making process and the characteristics of each colour must be observed beforehand.

Right colours for right interiors

It is necessary to understand that one’s choice of colour varies with the intention of each space. A commercial space has its own standard colours. A residential interior, meanwhile, is commonly dominated by warm tones. It is possible that this rule might again vary with the demands of specifi c clients. The location of the space in question, the placement of the materials, weather, climate and the psychology of individuals are other factors that must be taken into account. Colours, without any doubt, provide visual pleasure. However, it must also not be forgotten that they are also associated with human behaviours ranging from change of mood to health and hygiene. Choosing the right colour for the right space is a therefore a decision pending on various factors. Colour scheme planning in interior design is one crucial element whose importance must not be overlooked. This interior plan of a semi-open living and dining space shows a play between the green of the living room couch set and flooring, and the light teak of the dining room furniture and flooring. The natural world provides a sense of harmony in colour and is an inspiring source from which to attain almost perfect colour schemes, textures and patterns.

The natural world provides a sense of harmony in colour and is an inspiring source from which to attain almost perfect colour schemes, textures and patterns.

 

Testing colour schemes

Once a colour scheme has been finalized, it can be tested by many mediums to avoid any randomness in the developed system. Any unplanned relationships between the colours to be applied can be avoided by converting them into samples. The colour theme can be related to the initial design concepts by being converted into demonstrative charts or samples. Colour data regarding all the elements that have been pre planned can also be prepared to test the colour schemes. Such sample charts or other convenient mediums must be taken into account. These samples represent the actual location and materials to be used in the assigned work. Besides preparing charts and material samples.


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